Pelagic Research center

FOUND A TAG?

Found a Tag? Please contact us immediately.

Over the years, LPRC scientists have deployed four different types of tags on bluefin tuna, bigeye tuna, and sailfish. Additionally, in 2012, we are beginning a new Atlantic-wide bluefin tagging program (GBYP), under which we will be deploying a large numbers of tags. For implanted archival and simple ID tags, our research depends on the successful recovery of these tags. Recaptures of all tags deployed by LPRC researchers under GBYP are eligible for rewards. Depending on the research program and the time of deployment, the contact information on our tags may direct you to UNH, UMass, or NMFS. Recaptures of all of these tags can be reported directly to us or to the contact written on the tag. Please read on to determine which kind of tag you have and how to get in touch with us.

What kind of tag have you found?

tags

Bright Orange Streamer Tag (Tag “a” in picture) – You’ve found one of our traditional tags placed on a bluefin tuna by a recreational angler or an LPRC researcher. If the tag was deployed under our GBYP program, you will receive a reward of $50 and a t-shirt. Please cut off the tag, record the tag number, the latitude/longitude of the catch, and the curved fork length of the fish (or estimation of length) and contact Emily Chandler (978-283-0368).

Bright Green Streamer Tag (Just like Tag “a” in picture but in green) – You’ve found one of two types of green streamer tags:

  1. The first type is a conventional high-reward tag placed on the tuna by an LPRC researcher. This tag is part of the GBYP program. If returned, you are eligible for a $200 reward! Please cut off the tag, record the tag number, the latitude/longitude of the catch, and the curved fork length of the fish (or estimation of length) and contact Emily Chandler (978-283-0368).
  2. The second type has “Internal Archival Tag in Fish!” written on the tag and is one of our implanted archival tags placed on bluefin tuna by LPRC. The green tag is only a marker indicating the presence of an electronic tag implanted within the ventral (or “belly”) side of the fish. The tag itself looks like the tag labeled “B” in the picture. Please retain the whole fish and contact us immediately. As long as we are contacted immediately, the fish does not count towards bag or size limits. We will instruct you about what we need from the fish. If we are able to collect the data we need, fishermen are eligible for a $500 reward!!!! Contact Molly Lutcavage (603-767-2129) or Emily Chandler (978-283-0368).

View our Implanted Archival Tag reward poster for more information.

Black bulb-like tag (Tags “c and d” in picture) – You have found one of our pop-up satellite tags (PSATs) placed on a bluefin tuna, bigeye tuna, or saifish by LPRC or one of our collaborators and fishing partners. These tags are anchored near the base of the fish’s 2nd dorsal fin, and are programmed to release from the fish after one year. Therefore, the tag you found may or may not still be attached to the fish. If the tag is attached to the fish, please cut off the tag, record the tag number, the latitude/longitude of the catch, and the curved fork length of the fish (or estimation of length) and contact us immediately. There is a $500 reward for the return of a functioning tag (either on or off the fish) and a $200 reward for a non-functioning tag! We also want to know if you found a fish with only the tag’s tether remaining. If you find one of these tags, please contact Molly Lutcavage (603-767-2129) or Emily Chandler (978-283-0368).

Bright Yellow Streamer Tag (Just like Tag “a” in picture but in yellow) – You’ve found a conventional tag deployed under the GBYP program by ICCAT on an eastern Atlantic or Mediterranean Sea bluefin tuna. You are eligible for a reward of 50 euros and a t-shirt! Please cut off the tag, record the tag number, the latitude/longitude of the catch, and the curved fork length of the fish (or estimation of length) and contact Emily Chandler (978-283-0368).